A couple cool items from the inbox this week. 

Bennie “M”
First up, a correction.  I wrote that Bump Elliott was the first coach to don the block ‘M’ hat in this post, but reader Dennis Dail corrected me noting that Bennie Oosterbaan actually slipped on the ‘M’ lid earlier.

The evidence comes via this wire photo in Dennis’s collection:

bennie O M

Bennie in Color
Speaking of Oosterbaan, reader Larry sent this over.  As a hobby Larry colorizes old photos and check out Bennie O. in this famous photo before the 1927 Ohio State dedication game: 

bennieoBennie O. is receiving flowers from Gwen Dew who handled PR for FTD Florists.  On the right is Buckeye captain Ted Meyer and Catherine Tallant of Ohio State.

One more he sent – check out Tom Harmon tearing it up in 1940 in Columbus in color:

harmon colorized

Meyer Morton

Ok, one more with Oosterbaan ties (and please note, I’ll have more on this in the future).  Reader David is the son of former Michigan player Don Dugger who won the annual Meyer Morton award in 1954 under coach Oosterbaan.  The award has been given out since 1925 to “the football player who shows the greatest development and most promise as a result of the annual spring practice.” 

They used to issue an actual trophy and yes, David owns it today and sent over a photo:

meyer_morton_trophy
Sweet.  Although I can’t spot the confirmation on mgoblue.com, I believe FB John McColgan was the recipient this spring. 

I discussed the MM in more detail here and I shared this photo of the 1932 winner–future President Gerald Ford, holding the trophy:

Very cool. 

Thanks David, Dennis and Larry and thanks everyone for the great notes of late.

Bonus: For more Bennie O., check out this republished piece from the Muskegon Chronicle (HT: mgoblog).

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8 Comments

  1. Is there some way we can order a copy of one of these colorized photos?

  2. Hmmm. It looks like the maize in those pants might be a little off. Too bright, not enough orange.

    Not really.

  3. @Wm Wilson
    I’ll let Larry field that one

  4. Wm Wilson , If Greg does not mind he can send you my email and you can ask questions if you like. I really just felt like sharing my work.

    MGoShoe. I can easily tweak the pants color in that Harmon one. I saved a few different versions of it. I think I used a Warmify edit and that gave the pants that shade of maize. I have others where they are more yellow like.

    FYI Ohio State really did have black numbers in 1939. If any of you still have the HBO rivalry show. Right near the very beginning, around the 6 minute mark they show Ohio State running on the field in silver pants and black numbers on front.

  5. I have seen colorization before and most are very bad, those 2 are very good for a nice change!!

  6. I meant to say Ohio State wore black numbers in 1939 and 1940. I have seen color film of them from 1939.

    Also nice to see more info on the 2 young ladies in the dedication game photo. That was interesting to learn about Gwen and Catherine.

  7. @LarryB
    Larry, I was kidding about the color because of the never ending debate about what true maize is and whether or not the current version is sufficiently traditional. Greg did a post about this subject that mostly settled the debate.

    Love the work and I’m looking forward to seeing more of it featured here, if possible. Colorization is a fascinating thing as it lends new perspectives to bygone eras.

  8. MGoShoe :
    @LarryB
    Larry, I was kidding about the color because of the never ending debate about what true maize is and whether or not the current version is sufficiently traditional. Greg did a post about this subject that mostly settled the debate.
    Love the work and I’m looking forward to seeing more of it featured here, if possible. Colorization is a fascinating thing as it lends new perspectives to bygone eras.

    I thought you may have been kidding since I did see the Not Really. But I was not sure. Yes I read the columns about the maize changing? And the 2 toned pants pictures that were shown a while back. I always check this site. Great for history.

    Oh and thanks for the kind words.