21. August 2011 · 2 comments · Categories: 2011

We’ve all had our share of chuckles about the Ohio State gear up on eBay, especially the gold pants, but this is a bit different.   Right now a seller is offering up what he claims to be several charms that belonged to Buckeye legend and 1944 Heisman Trophy winner Les Horvath:

buckeye charms

Apparently Horvath put the bracelet together for his wife and the seller is a personal friend.  It includes:

1942 Gold Pants charm – awarded for the victory over rival Michigan
1944 Gold Pants charm – awarded for the victory over rival Michigan
1944 Chicago Tribune Player of the year football shaped charm
1944 Football charm awarded for being named to Colliers All-America Team
1942 Big Nine Western Conference Champions football shaped charm
1944 Big NIne Western Conference Champions football shaped charm

Seller is asking a cool $9,999 for the collection.  [Memo to the seller: If you are looking for ten large for anything on eBay, mix in some higher quality photos.]

This deserves a good home.

2 Comments

  1. Interesting. But $9,999? Good grief. I looked at that sellers other items. He has a Les Horvath 1943 game worn East West All star game jersey. That is a $ 12,999 asking price. How can anybody justify those prices. It is white with red felt numbers and red around the neck towards shoulder.

    I saw that 1931 jersey on here for close to $ 3,000 I think it was.

  2. Here is an update for you… I have sold the bracelet to a rather estatic Buckeye fan who could not be happier with his purchase. The bracelet is quite a remarkable piece of college football history (as is the case with most of my collection) especially since these Gold Pants and other charms were awarded to a Heisman trophy winner. As to Larry’s comments regarding the asking price of the bracelet and the jersey, I would offer a few points. First, an item is only worth the amount someone is willing to pay for it. While it may seem excessive to him there are collectors, fans, and alumni with the means to purchase these types of items who understand the rarity of the piece and who are willing to pay for quality. Secondly, these items are museum quality pieces. A jersey from the 1931 East-West game may be valued at $3000.00. But who’s jersey was it? A college Football Hall of Fame member? A Heisman trophy winner? I doubt it. These items are all one of a kind (as I am sure the jersey you mentioned is). You can not purchase a game worn Les Horvath jersey any time you wish. In fact I doubt you will ever see another one. That is how I justify my pricing!