[Ed. Mandatory reading for Jug Week. This post discusses whether the original jug that Michigan bought (likely on October 30, 1903) and Oscar Munson found (on November 1 or 2, 1903, is the same jug that will be on the field this Saturday night.  If you haven’t read it I think you’ll like it.]

One of the critical questions I asked when I started research was this: Is the jug that Michigan equipment manager Jon Falk has tucked away the same crock that was purchased by U-M student manager Tommy Roberts in Minneapolis back in 1903 and returned to Fielding Yost in 1909?

I knew a key to resolving this was determining what exactly occurred during the period the jug was missing in the 1930s, which I covered in Part I of this series.  The net of that research is that the folks who would best know (people like Yost, Minnesota’s Oscar Munson) believed that the jug that was found in some bushes on East University Ave in 1933 was indeed the real deal.

This is a helpful data point but hardly answers the question of whether the jug survived all these years.

Did it Break?
If the jug were replaced along the way, it would either have been the result of a theft (like that in the 1930s) or if it were broken and replaced.   Falk told me of one frightening incident when it almost went the way of Humpty Dumpty. It seems after one Michigan victory in the mid-80s the jug was resting on a table in the equipment room.   His daughter Katie, about four years old at the time, decided to climb up for a better view. “She jumped up on the table and it teeter-tottered,” Falk recalled with a smile. “We ran over and caught it before it fell off the table, and we still tease her about that.”   That was the closest call on Falk’s watch.

The only potential major incident of damage involves an something I raised this in Part V of the series, when the Minnesota Daily in 1929 included this blurb, suggesting something happened when the jug traveled to Minnesota in 1924:

As I mentioned in that post, I tried to dig into this a little further but I wasn’t able to validate this alleged damage in any of the papers in 1924.  Game accounts from the 1924 game do not mention any sign of a broken or dinged jug and in fact, some written game summaries note that the jug was on display on the sideline during the ‘24 game, apparently in good health.

IF the jug needed to be fixed, Red Wing would likely be the place to do it or <gulp> replace it.  But beyond finding no other evidence that this occurred, the story above claims the jug (with unspecified damage) was repaired and put back into service.  Talking to folks that would know, depending the extent of the damage it’s possible to repair a jug, seal it and repaint it with little evidence (you wouldn’t have “glazed” it which implies a refiring which would have likely 86’d the jug).   I found no visual evidence of damage on the existing crock.

In 1960 Oscar Munson, the Minnesota custodian who found the Michigan jug in 1903, told a reporter that Yost had indeed replaced the jug a some point along the way.  The timing is unclear, but Munson claimed, “Yost came and got it after they won, but it got broke at Michigan and Yost bought another for $35 in Red Wing.”

In a 1979 special edition of Michigan Replay, Bo’s second wife Millie Schembechler discussed the memorabilia exhibit she helped assemble for the 100-year anniversary celebration of the football program.  When discussing the jug, she said that today’s jug was not the original–that the 1903 crock was broken at some point.

Expert Witnesses
Given the drama that went on in the 1930s and possibly in the 1920s, it is tough to what to believe. To solve the question of authenticity I moved beyond the news clippings and started snooping around.

I sought out the men that have protected the jug over the years: the equipment managers. Michigan’s Jon Falk has cared for the trophy for most of the past thirty-six years thanks to the Wolverines’ dominance on the field over this stretch. Falk was hired by Bo Schembechler in 1974 and probably knows more about the jug than anyone.  Along with sharing a few great stories, Falk told me that his understanding is that the jug he’s got tucked away is indeed the original.

Bob Hurst began his tenure with the Michigan athletic department after returning from WWII. He worked directly with legendary equipment manager Henry ‘Hank’ Hatch, who performed the duty from 1919 to 1964. Hurst, who lives in Florida today, told me over the phone that he was always told this was the genuine jug.

On the other sideline, I spoke with longtime Gopher equipment manager Dick Mattson who served the school from 1963 to 2008. While Minnesota has only held the prize three times since 1968, he didn’t hesitate when I asked him about the authenticity. “It’s the original jug,” Mattson insisted.   And we know that back in 1935 Oscar Munson (the man who found the jug in 1903) following the disappearance in the 1930s told reporters, “It’s the original jug, all right, and I’m the only one who knows.”

But other folks well-versed in the Michigan traditions expressed doubt. Bruce Madej, the longtime Wolverine sports media relations director told me, “We’re just not sure.”

Greg Kinney, curator of the athletic archives housed at Michigan’s terrific Bentley Library, has seen various photos and stories on the jug over the years, but wasn’t certain when I approach him with the question.   Former Michigan head coach Lloyd Carr, who enjoyed retelling the origins of the jug rivalry before the Minnesota game each season, told me he always believed today’s trophy wasn’t the original jug.

Visual Comparisons
Given the range of opinions from the experts I decided I needed to dig a bit deeper. Thankfully a request to inspect today’s jug was granted and I visited Jon Falk on campus in the spring of 2009.  Falk shared some great stories of jug lore and I took a bunch of photos of the jug.

Using a graphics editor, I was able to compare my new photos with the white ‘Oscar’ jug (dating to the start of the rivalry) by applying a degree of transparency and overlaying the images. The match was nearly precise:

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The ‘Oscar’ jug seemed slightly shorter (less than an inch) although the spout, handle and shoulder seemed to be dead on. I realized that photo comparisons are helpful but I’ve learned that perspectives can change drastically depending on the angle of the camera and of course with any distortion in the images (especially a photo over 100 years old).

Closer inspection of my photos showed that the worn-down handle and chips in the paint on revealed a pale tone similar to that of the Oscar jug:

Little Brown Jug Closeup

The visual signs, at least to a novice, seemed to lean toward authenticity. If today’s jug were replaced at some point one would wonder the lengths someone would have to go through to swap the original jug with such a close visual match, seemingly made of the same material.

While the photo comparisons were compelling I needed an expert’s perspective.

A Master Potter’s Perspective
The Ann Arbor area is blessed with many artisans and after asking around I was given the name of Ryan Forrey, the Master Potter at The Henry Ford Museum/Greenfield Village.

Forrey holds a Bachelors of Fine Art from the New York State College of Ceramics and has worked at The Henry Ford since 1996. He has traveled the world studying his craft in other cultures and his pottery can be seen in collections from United States to China.

While inspecting several photos of the jug from over the years, Forrey paid particular attention to the handle, a distinctive element of handmade jugs. The handles are formed by pulling a piece of clay between the potter’s fingers before attaching it to the shoulder, and the shape and style of the handles between the photos seemed to match in Forrey’s opinion.

While the photos were helpful, alone they weren’t enough for Forrey to offer a firm opinion on the matter.  Among other things, he wanted to confirm that the color on the sides of the jug wasn’t a glaze, which would suggest the jug was specifically made for the teams (and not painted over).  He needed to see and hold the jug.

The Return Visit
Several weeks later Forrey and I were greeted by Jon Falk inside Schembechler Hall. The jug was waiting for us a top a table in the equipment room, released from its protective trunk.

clip_image012

Forrey quickly pointed out several critical features.  First, the color on the trophy was indeed paint.  Next, beneath the Minnesota logo ‘M’, he spotted a flaw or notch that seems to be evident on the ‘Oscar’ jug. It’s difficult to confirm through a 100+ year-old photograph, but the shape and location of the imperfection seem to match dead on.

clip_image014

Finally, Forrey pointed out a glaring feature of today’s jug, something that I didn’t notice on my first trip. The outline of an alternatively-styled Minnesota ‘M’ logo can be seen beneath the layers of paint:

clip_image016

Forrey had seen enough. From comparison of the photos, to the distinct match of the shape of the handle, to the notch that appeared to be on early photo of the crock, he was convinced that the jug we viewed was indeed the original.

The Old Gopher ‘M’
Days after our visit I became more and more intrigued about the pointy Minnesota ‘M’ Forrey spotted beneath the paint. After digging through articles and photos from the 1920s, I found two instances of an alternately styled logo. The program to the 1923 game held in Ann Arbor thankfully depicts a drawing on the cover featuring the Gopher side of the jug. Later I uncovered a photo from 1927 of Minnesota captain Herb Joesting cradling the crock, with the Gopher side facing the camera.  Each image presents a pointy M that matches the style evident beneath the current coat of paint:

clip_image018
While I was fairly satisfied by Forrey’s conclusion, the art on the 1923 game program and the Joesting photo (matched up against the current embossed paint evidence) suggests that the jug likely dates the jug at least to the early 1920s.

Recapping the evidence:

  • The Minnesota Daily note claiming it was repaired in Red Wing 1924.
  • Oscar Munson’s claim in 1960 that the jug was swapped out for a replacement Red Wing jug at some point.
  • Accounts from three living equipment managers, in particular Bob Hurst who served with Henry Hatch, who in turn served the university starting in 1919. Each told me they believe the jug is the original.
  • Newspaper articles noting that Oscar Munson and Fielding Yost both validated that the jug that reappeared in 1933 was the authentic article.
  • The nearly precise image overlay of today’s jug against the photo of the ‘Oscar jug’.
  • The opinion of Ryan Forrey, Master Potter of the Henry Ford Museum, who told me, “I’d be shocked if this isn’t the original jug.”
  • The flaw at the bottom of the Minnesota side that appears on the original jug.
  • Finally, the outline of the older style Minnesota ‘M’ logo beneath the current paint that likely dates the jug at least the early 1920s.

After weighing the evidence I’m comfortable concluding that the trophy tucked away in Ann Arbor today dates at least to the mid-1920s.    Is it the same Little Brown Jug that was left behind in 1903 and handed back to Fielding Yost over a century ago in 1909?   In my opinion, the evidence points to a strong possibility that today’s jug is indeed the real deal – but I’m not completely convinced.

Related:
Read the rest of the Little Brown Jug Lore Series

30. October 2017 · Comments Off on On the Precipice (1903) | Little Brown Jug Lore · Categories: 2015 · Tags: , , , , , ,

It’s Little Brown Jug Week.

Much has been written on these pages about what happened in the days, years and decades following the famous 1903 Michigan-Minnesota game.  Here are a few nuggets that describe what was going on just before the game, thanks to a few newspaper clippings uncovered by Stagg vs. Yost author John Kryk.

Scheduled Game time: 2:15pm October 31, 1903
Series Record: Up to this point Michigan led 4-2.  (Minnesota won the first two meetings in 1892 & 1893, Michigan took the next four 1895, 1896, 1898, 1902)
Hype: Billed as one of the biggest games in Western football in years, Minnesota came in undefeated 10-0, and outscored opponents 506-6.  Yost hadn’t lost a game since he stepped foot in Ann Arbor in 1901, and to this point in 1903 the team was 7-0, outscoring opponents 437-0.
Tale of the Tape: From the October 30, 1903 Minnesota Journal, a comparison of the line-ups with Michigan having the 20 pound weight advantage:

Tale of the Tape

Speaking of the Armory – We know now that Minnesota equipment man Oscar Munson found Michigan’s water jug inside the Armory a day or 2 after the game, and, we know that Athletic Director L.J. Cooke suspended the jug above his office in the Armory from 1903 to 1909:

Armory and Jug

Quoting Coach Yost:  Before the game a Minnesota man asked him, “Are you going to beat us?”  “Well, that’s what we came up here for,” replied Yost.  “It will be a great game, and probably a close game.  Minnesota has been playing better football than any team in the west this year…if we win this, we win the championship.”

Travel and Lodging: The travel contingent arrived on the morning of Friday, October 30th and included 21 players (the first and second teams) along with Yost, his staff, AD Charles Baird, trainer Keene Fitzpatrick.  They had breakfast at “Schiek’s” before then headed to their quarters at Lake Minnetonka at around 9:30am.

They stayed at the Ice Yacht clubhouse – and check this out – I found this shot of the Michigan squad outside the building in 1903 via the Hennepin County Library – sweet!:

1903 Ice Yacht Clubhouse And if my eyes don’t deceive, that appears to be Yost wearing some sort of hat with a Block M on it – whoa:

Yost with Block M hat

While the close-up is grainy, I’m guessing what you have there is an M flanked by 03 and 04, denoting the school year and thus the academic and athletic calendar.

One other thing.  Notably missing from this photo is equipment man Tommy Roberts, the man who the story goes actually bought the jug for Yost.  Here he is in the 1903 team photo:

It’s not far fetched to speculate that Roberts is missing from the photo because he was off buying the jug.  Mull on that.

Wagering and the man from Fargo: By all accounts many a bet were laid down on this big game – $75,000 by some accounts.  Michigan by and large seemed to be favored.  Putting the match up aside, since Yost’s arrival in 1901 only one team – Wisconsin in 1902 – had even stayed within a few touchdowns of his Wolverines.  The Minneapolis Journal shared this detail and story of one bigshot who felt good about the Gophers:

image

There are too many pikers everywhere if you ask me.

Minnesota’s Final Practice: According to the Minnesota Journal the Gophers “took her final hard practice yesterday (10/29) afternoon.  Unusual precautions were taken to preserve secrecy.  A double force of guards watched the  gates and patrolled the stands, while others kept watch from the top of the brick walls surrounding Northrop field.”’

Michigan’s Final Practice: “Michigan spent the day quietly at Lake Minnetonka.  The men were given their last signal drill, and listened for an hour while Coach Yost outlined the details of the plan of attack.”

Tickets: They were likely between $2-$3 (based on Midwest tickets from the era). They were color-coded to indicate where to enter:

  • Red – East (on Harvard Street)
  • Green – Southwest (corner of the field, near the railroad tracks)
  • Yellow – North (at University and 18th avenues)
  • Blue – – Northwest (on Church Street, near the Armory).  That’s where the holder of this beauty entered the field:

1903 Minnesota-Michigan Ticket Stub

Gameday Weather:  According to a Minneapolis Journal report, “The weather was almost ideal with scarcely a breath of wind and the field was hard and in as perfect shape as could be desired.”

Crowd: It was estimated later that over 20,000 were on prem, including around 400 in the Michigan section.  By all accounts it was packed.  “Nearly an hour before the game was called the seats allotted for general admission were filled and the crowd was packed six deep outside the wire fence.  The grand stand filled up rapidly and it seemed probable that hundreds would be turned away.”  The Pioneer Press noted, “The telegraph poles and trees are full of spectators..” …which we know from this famous photo of the game:

Northrup Field 1903

Tauntings: The Minnesota band entered the field before the game led by a donkey, and, ahem, “the animal wore trousers of Michigan colors.”  [They didn’t get those pants from Moe’s.]  When the Michigan second team players arrived they were greeted with a rousing chorus of “Poor old Mich” by the Gopher Fans.

Arrivals: The Wolverine team entered the field around 2:07pm.  The Gophers at 2:20pm.

Coin Toss: 2:25pm, Minnesota won the toss.

Kickoff: At 2:28pm: Michigan kicked off to Minnesota’ Sig Harris who fumbled the ball.  Minnesota started at their own 15 yard line.  Then this:

1903 Michigan Minnesota play chart

You need more?  Get more.  Here’s your Little Brown Jug Lore.

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28. October 2017 · Comments Off on Not Going Overboard Rutgers Champions | Dr. Sap Decals · Categories: 2017

Steve “Dr. Sap” Sapardanis is a Schembechler-era savant and once again this season he’ll be diligently handing out his postgame helmet stickers after each game. Sap has pored over hours and hours of U-M games over several decades, and in these posts he’s able to tie the present to the past.  I encourage you to subscribe to Dr. Sap on YouTube, or follow Sap on Twitter.

OFFENSIVE CHAMPION – It is now official – the Brandon Peters era has begun! Something a lot of fans had been looking forward to, finally happened on Saturday. I gotta admit, as I was watching the Michigan offense wallow in their own mediocrity on TV, I actually fell asleep watching the first quarter. Yes, things were looking that bad. But, much like the crowd, and seemingly the Wolverine offense and coaches, the Maize and Blue spirits were lifted when #18 came into the game. The late Frank Broyles, with his deep southern drawl, may have said it best back in the day to his TV sidekick, Keith Jackson, “You are seeing the making of a quarterbaaack tonight, Keith!” I think we did as well, today. Peters looked poised and threw with confidence.  Did you notice how Peters checked off at the line of scrimmage on Higdon’s last TD?  Not sure if it was just a line check/blocking change or a complete audible and play change, but he saw something and Higdon went all the way.  THAT play right there told me he was ready to start and lead this team!!

I’ve said this before, and I’ll say it again – It’s totally different playing QB coming off the bench than it is starting the game. Let’s enjoy the excitement for a while, but not go overboard. It’s just one game. But oh, those were some nice throws!!!

DEFENSIVE CHAMPION – We all know that Maurice Hurst is a beast up front and his quickness is amazing, so…should we start talking about #73 as the best player in country? I know he just ate an under-manned Rutgers O-Line for lunch (Get in my Belly!), but this is not the first or second time Mo Hurst has been THE dominant player on the field. So, should Hurst get an invite to NYC come the first week of December? I think so!

SPECIAL TEAMS CHAMPION – I didn’t see much out of DPJ on Saturday returning punts. Quinn Nordin missed a field goal. Not all the kickoffs were (1970’s non-returnable) aluminum beer cans. So…Garrett Moores for being spot-on with his holds and placements? Ya – #15 it is! Can’t take that part of the kicking game for granted.

COACHING CHAMPION – Sometimes when you finally have your dream car, you’re afraid to let the throttle out and see what the machine can do. Before the game, I think the feeling that Coach Jim Harbaugh had on playing Peters at QB could have been best summed up with this photo:

Cautiously excited, but still a little nervous. YIKES!!
But after Peters led the Wolverines to three TD’s on his first three possessions, Coach looked a little more like himself:

Nice to see what Peters could finally do in a game situation against an opponent with the game on the line. The throttle wasn’t totally let out, but it was opened up a bit and man did the ride feel nice! “Who’s got it better than us? Nobody!!”

UNIFORM CHAMPION – Is it me, or does the Helmet Number Sticker on the back of the helmets finally match the font on the Michigan jerseys? If so, I’m all down with that! Never liked it when those didn’t match! Kudos, and of course a helmet sticker, to the Michigan Equipment Staff if that is the case!

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Week by Week Champions (O = Offense, D = Defense, T = Special Teams, C = Coaching, U = Uniform, E = Editor’s pick)
Week 1 vs. Florida:  Ty Issac (O), Devin Bush (D), Quinn Nordin (T), Don Brown, Greg Mattison (C), all-maize unis (U), Camaron Cheeseman (E)
Week 2 vs. Cincinnati:  Ty Issac (O), Tyree Kinnel (D), Grant Perry (T), Greg Mattison (C), refined helmet decals (U).
Week 3 vs. Air Force:  N/A (O), Chase Winovich (D), Quinn Nordin & Donovan Peoples-Jones (T), Jim Harbaugh (C), full on maize and blue uniforms (U)
Week 4 vs. Purdue: John O’Korn (O), Devin Bush (D), Brad Robbins (T), Don Brown (C), white-arm-sleeves-on-shins (U)
Week 5 vs. Michigan State: N/A
Week 6 vs. Indiana: Karan Higdon (O), Maurice Hurst (D) and (T), Tim Drevno (C)
Week 7 vs. Penn State:  N/A
Week 8 vs. Rutgers:

28. October 2017 · Comments Off on The Million Dollar Touchdown | This Week in Michigan Football History · Categories: 2017

 

This edition of #TWIMFbH goes back to the 1800s, first to discuss the history of the Alumni Association, then we look at former U-M player and 1899 head coach Gustave Ferbert.  Coaches weren’t paid like they are today, and “Dutch” Ferbert actually hung up his whistle to seek his fortune in the Alaska gold rush!

Here’s the clip:

TWIMFbH is sponsored by Hillside Terrace of Ann Arbor.  This segment can be heard on the Keybank Countdown to Kickoff and you can listen live on 1050AM in Ann Arbor & on wtka.com around the world.  This segment plays approximately 2 hours before kickoff each week.

You can hear the archive of This Week in Michigan Football History clips here.    If you have suggestions for future games hit me on Twitter @MVictors.  Go Blue!

/script …after the jump

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21. October 2017 · 1 comment · Categories: 2017

For Tonight’s edition of This Week in Michigan Football History we stroll back all the way to the 1920s, a decade that saw the construction of Yost Field House and later, Michigan Stadium.
The 1920s also saw a few Wolverine all-time greats take the gridiron, including Meeeechigan men like Harry Kipke – who helped Yost earn another national title in 1923, as well as legends Bennie Oosterbaan and Benny Friedman.
One name that’s not often mentioned from that decade is man named Paul Goebel. Goebel was born in 1901, just around the time Michigan hired Fielding Yost to lead the football squad into an era of point-a-minute mayhem.  At around 6 foot 5, he was a giant for his day.  A while you won’t hear him mentioned with greats like Anthony Carter, Braylon Edwards, Derrick Alexander and David Terrell – he was the first Michigan end to don the once coveted #1 jersey.  If nothing else, you should know his name because of what he did on this day 95 years ago in Columbus, Ohio:

Here’s the clip:

 

TWIMFbH is sponsored by Hillside Terrace of Ann Arbor.  This segment can be heard on the Keybank Countdown to Kickoff and you can listen live on 1050AM in Ann Arbor & on wtka.com around the world.  This segment plays approximately 2 hours before kickoff each week.

You can hear the archive of This Week in Michigan Football History clips here.    If you have suggestions for future games hit me on Twitter @MVictors.  Go Blue!

 

/script …after the jump

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19. October 2017 · Comments Off on A Toast to Yost from Coast to Coast – with Production · Categories: 2017

H/T to Craig at HSR and H/T to mgoblog’s coveted mgoboard.  Coincidentally on this day back in 1940:

Nicely done!

Sure, readers of this site have already heard clips of this event, but I love how this gent pulled it together with the pics and context.   And because there are a few shots of Yost in this beauty, I thought I’d repost this compilation of the Grand Old Man over the years:

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16. October 2017 · Comments Off on The Art of Meechigan Video · Categories: 2017

I’ve known U-M football archivist Art Vuolo for a while because he’s omnipresent.  You can find him rolling tape at anything Michigan related—games, busts, award ceremonies, outings…you name it.  I promised Art a plug and here goes:

Since 1979, Art Vuolo has been on the photo deck of the Michigan press box for nearly every single home game capturing, on video, the action and excitement, but most of all, the things not seen or heard on television.  He features the elements that make all the football Saturdays in Ann Arbor a true fan experience, like the tailgates, the pre-game festivities, the marching band, halftime show, special on field presentations and best of all…he offers complete games dubbed and synchronized with the Michigan radio broadcast instead of the clowns on the networks.

In the mid-1970’s Vuolo produced the famous Bob Ufer albums, now on CD.  He began recording the games from radio when Bo Schembechler arrived in 1969 and nearly every game features Ufer (yes, complete Ufer games), Frank Beckmann and now Jim Brandstatter and Dan Dierdorf.

He doesn’t do this to make money — Art does it to spread the love.

If you want a certain game or the entire season, reach out to Art via his web site: www.vuolovideo.com, or via e-mail: artvuolo@aol.com.

15. October 2017 · Comments Off on Get in My Belly | Dr. Sap’s Decals · Categories: 2017

Steve “Dr. Sap” Sapardanis is a Schembechler-era savant and once again this season he’ll be diligently handing out his postgame helmet stickers after each game. Sap has pored over hours and hours of U-M games over several decades, and in these posts he’s able to tie the present to the past.  I encourage you to subscribe to Dr. Sap on YouTube, or follow Sap on Twitter.

OFFENSIVE CHAMPION – Easy to single out Karan Higdon for this, but I’m going with the Big Uglies up front – specifically the Interior O-Line. It seemed like most of the successful (running) plays were straight up the middle. And while it’s difficult to single out just one guy, I’ll go with all three interior linemen. We saw some hints of this last week against another basketball school, so it was nice to see that it wasn’t a one-week-wonder.

DEFENSIVE CHAMPION – For this defense to click, it has to start with pressure up front, and Maurice Hurst seemed to bring it all game. If Fat Bastard (of Austin Powers fame) were to call or describe one of Mo Hurst’s sacks, I’m sure he’d exclaim, “Get In My Belly,” every time #73 took down an opponent and then rubbed his belly. So ya, Mo Hurst gets a helmet sticker. Yeah, baby!!

SPECIAL TEAMS CHAMPION – Don’t ever think blocking a field goal is easy to do or a non-factor. Maurice Hurst did that against IU and for the longest time it looked like that would be the difference in the game. It ended up not being the case, but still underscores the importance of what Hurst did. “Get In My Belly!!!”

COACHING CHAMPION – Nice to see Assistant Head Coach Tim Drevno channel his inner Bo Schembechler. Back in the day, whenever Michigan lost a game they shouldn’t have, Bo always liked to say that the best way to correct those mistakes that led to the loss was to get back to basics. That meant running the ball, A LOT, and running it between the tackles. There was a reason Bob Ufer used to always say, “Two tight ends and a balanced line” to start his call of a play. That basic formation dictated how the defense was to line up. If the D played straight up, then the O-Line knew their blocking assignments were pretty much the guy across the line of scrimmage. If the D over-shifted to one side of the play, the offense would run the other way. Pretty simple stuff, much like the old acronym: KISS – Keep It Simple Stupid. When it works, like it did against IU, it looks pretty simple, and effective. When it doesn’t? “Get back to basics – that’s just fundamental!” just like the old ball coach used to say.

UNIFORM CHAMPION – Ok, I’m down with the all white unis on the road, but when the home team wears white pants, can Michigan at least have the option to wear their maize pants? I just didn’t like that look against Indiana. Maybe next week against Penn State this possibility can be explored? Just sayin’… In the meantime, no sticker for you!

 

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Week by Week Champions (O = Offense, D = Defense, T = Special Teams, C = Coaching, U = Uniform, E = Editor’s pick)
Week 1 vs. Florida:  Ty Issac (O), Devin Bush (D), Quinn Nordin (T), Don Brown, Greg Mattison (C), all-maize unis (U), Camaron Cheeseman (E)
Week 2 vs. Cincinnati:  Ty Issac (O), Tyree Kinnel (D), Grant Perry (T), Greg Mattison (C), refined helmet decals (U).
Week 3 vs. Air Force:  N/A (O), Chase Winovich (D), Quinn Nordin & Donovan Peoples-Jones (T), Jim Harbaugh (C), full on maize and blue uniforms (U)
Week 4 vs. Purdue: John O’Korn (O), Devin Bush (D), Brad Robbins (T), Don Brown (C), white-arm-sleeves-on-shins (U)
Week 5 vs. Michigan State: N/A
Week 6 vs. Indiana: Karan Higdon (O), Maurice Hurst (D) and (T), Tim Drevno (C)
Week 7 vs. Penn State:  N/A
Week 8 vs. Rutgers:

14. October 2017 · Comments Off on Harmon vs. Kinnick (1939) | This Week in Michigan Football History · Categories: 2017

Harmon picks off Kinnick (1939)

This week’s game hits features a 1939 face off between two of the biggest names in college football history – Michigan’s Tom “Old 98” Harmon and Iowa’s Nile Kinnick.  Harmon dominated this game but Kinnick took home the 1939 Heisman – (98 finished second).

 

Here’s the clip:

TWIMFbH is sponsored by Hillside Terrace of Ann Arbor.  This segment can be heard on the Keybank Countdown to Kickoff and you can listen live on 1050AM in Ann Arbor & on wtka.com around the world.  This segment plays approximately 2 hours before kickoff each week.

You can hear the archive of This Week in Michigan Football History clips here.    If you have suggestions for future games hit me on Twitter @MVictors.  Go Blue!

 

/script …after the jump

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