27. September 2014 · Comments Off on Jugs, Hounds and Champions | Minnesota Pregame Photos · Categories: 2014 · Tags: , , , , ,

A few from pregame out here on a perfect day inside the Big House:

DSCN6611

Jug safe keeping

 

DSCN6626

The Official Braylon back in the house

 

DSCN6635Mad Magician and ‘64 Head Coach Bump Elliott and All-American QB Bob Timberlake

 

DSCN6631 Captain Jim Conley and Barry Dehlin

gear

DSCN6638

Frank “The Fudgehammer” Nunley and Rick Volk.  In ‘64 Volk pick off the Buckeyes twice in the 4th quarter to seal the game and a trip to the Rose Bowl.

Jil Gordon and Scott Robbins

My favorite Michigan artists – Jil Gordon of TrueBlue365 and Scott Robbins of The Blockhams.  Check out Scott’s latest with Ira and Sam on WTKA.

 

Photo Sep 27, 2 29 39 PM

 

Photo Sep 27, 1 12 15 PM Jon Falk preaching!  (While Steve Clarke is tweeting)

21. November 2013 · Comments Off on Moving The Game for JFK (1963) · Categories: 2013 · Tags: , , ,

Played November 30, 1963, scheduled November 23, 1963

On the eve of the 50th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination, a repost.  Back in 2009 I asked Dr. Barry Dehlin, a sophomore on Bump Elliott’s 1963 squad, to talk about his memories of that historic day.   The day after the shooting Ohio State was scheduled to be at the Big House but understandably that game was postponed to honor the President.   Here’s what Dehlin shared:

Naturally the assassination was a shock to all of us. I remember being in the dorm getting ready to go to practice when I heard what had happened. One of those sentinel moments in your life that you will always remember. We still met that Friday and the decision was already made that the game was postponed and would be played the next Saturday which of course was after Thanksgiving. The players would have to stay in town and not go home for Thanksgiving.

It was a cold week of practice but the interesting thing we did was bus to the Lions/Packers game on Thanksgiving. We sat on the field at Tiger stadium to watch the Lions and Packers tie. I believe that was the last game of the Lions and Packers on Thanksgiving for many years. That story I don’t know. [Ed: Correct. That game, a 13-13 tie, was the end of a string of thirteen straight Thanksgiving Day games for the Packers and Lions in Detroit.]

The game then was played the next Saturday and Ohio won on a pass to Paul Warfield in the end zone just over the hands of Jack Clancy. Warfield of course had a fine pro career and so did Clancy, who also was a wideout in the pros. Also remember the college game before 1965 did not allow unlimited substitution. On a fumble or interception only 2 players could be substituted each down for the first series. It was a much different game.

Thanks for letting me reminisce.

Go Blue

Great stuff.

The Ohio State loss capped a tough run for Elliott’s squad, as they finished 3-4-2 good for fifth in the conference. The following season, Dehlin along with captain Jim Conley turned things completely around capped off with a 10-0 victory in Columbus and a 34-7 thumping of Oregon State in the Rose Bowl.

Follow MVictors on Twitter

[Ed. The original post discussed this game and other times when games were moved.]

02. August 2011 · Comments Off on eBay Watch: That’s No BK Kids Meal Cup (1972) · Categories: 2011 · Tags: , , , ,

nunley_burger_king

Scanning through the recent eBay auctions, this caught my eye.   It’s a 1972 Burger King cup featuring then-San Francisco 49ers linebacker Frank Nunley.   Nunley patrolled the middle for Bump Elliott’s Wolverines from 1964-1966, earning all-Conference his senior season.

I was able to connect with Nunley who explained why his face ended up on BK cup. “Len Rhode, 49er offensive tackle, owned a few Burger Kings around here.  Still does,” Nunley wrote me.  “He featured a different 49er each week. I think that is where this came from.”

It was during his stint in SF that Nunley earned his nickname, “Fudge Hammer”.   According to Matt Maiocco’s book, San Francisco 49ers, Nunley owes the nickname to his NFL teammate Stan Hindman.   Apparently Nunley didn’t possess an intimidating physique but could drill opposing players with the best of them, as in, “he looked like fudge but hit like a hammer.”  

Naturally I needed to get a few memories on Nunley from 1964 team captain Jim Conley, who once again did not disappoint.  Enjoy:

Frank Nunley was a freshman when I was a senior.  I remember his first significant contribution to our 1964 team occurred when Dr. Barry Dehlin got a knee injury.   He came running into the defensive huddle and asked, "What do I do?".  I told him that Bill Yearby and I were going to knock the offensive line men on their asses and he would fill the hole and make the tackle.  And for the rest of his college career and his 10 years with the Forty Niners that was exactly what he did. 

frank_nunley_Michigan Every year, there was a new group of talented LBs that wanted his job.  But Frank kept on filling the hole and making the tackle.  For nine years, he had to line up over Tom Mack of the LA Rams.  To hear them talk, it always ended up as a draw.  I suspect, however, that Tom may have had the upper hand since he is in the Hall of Fame.  Frank insists that Tom got his credentials in all the other games. 

As a player Frank always kept it simple–he just hit someone.  He was not the strongest or the fastest LB, but he had the heart of a lion.  He always made the tackle but no one ever go hurt from his forearm shiver.   Frank played in the era of less pay and needed to have a career outside of football.  He worked in the off season and founded Nunley and Associates and was a very successful manufacturing rep at the birth of Silicon Valley. 

He is a great Michigan man and family man and remains very close to his wife Lynn since she manages the money.  Frank and I still visit on a regular basis when we can and enjoy talking Michigan.  

Today Nunley sells electronic assembly for Sanmina, a contract manufacturer, and he’s been a rep there for the past 12 years. 

You can buy the Nunley cup for $18.99 on eBay right now.

Follow MVictors on Twitter