On eBay right now, this –> a series of football ticket applications from the early 1930s, with one including this message from #1000SSS from The Grand Old Man himself:

Yost and drinkers

This wasn’t the only time that Yost spearheaded a message on the ills of drinking at games during this era.  Back in 2008 I noted this cartoon that appears in the 1934 yearbook:

drunkWhile we know folks found a way to drink during Prohibition, the law ended with ratification of the 21st Amendment on December 5, 1933.  That said, Michigan state law approved the sale of 3.2 percent alcohol earlier that year and I’m sure more than a few bottles of the good stuff found their way to and through the gates of Michigan Stadium.

Inconceivable

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BennieBen  McCready and Captain Jake Ryan

As a follow-up to my post from this weekend on the potential changes to the Legends program, today I chatted with Ben McCready, godson (and namesake) of Bennie Oosterbaan.  Ben confirmed that Jim Hackett called him about the Legends program.  A few notes:

  • Nothing is official, but U-M is indeed evaluating the Legends program and considering changes.
  • The evaluation is being driven, in part, by feedback from the players.
  • McCready’s understanding is that they do intend to maintain the Legends distinction, but are considering honoring those players in a different way.
  • All options are on the table including a presence in the stadium to recognize the Legends. 
  • Hackett is soliciting input from the Legends/families and has already connected with one other Legend/family.  Hackett will be talking with all the Legends families and keeping everyone in the loop as this moves forward.
  • Timeline is TBD, but McCready’s understanding is that they plan to settle this before the season starts.

McCready also told me, “I trust Jim Hackett completely,” and added, “I am very confident that everyone – the players, the fans and the Legends families, will be very happy with the way this all turns out.”

 

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Helmet Decals

So word is out that the helmet decals will return and the Legends program will be modified in some manner, starting with the patch on the jersey.  Bacs:

bacs tweet

Regarding the helmet stickers:  I’m not surprised (my spies confirmed a lot of chatter weeks ago) and you can imagine that I’m pretty jacked up and looking forward to the decal reveal. I’d prefer a replica or close variation of the Bo-era decals, but I’d go with a block M or whatever.  I know Dr. Sap has a few ideas that we’ll reveal down the road.  Heck, I’d even go with this design if it would mean cheaper tickets & Twizzler prices:Im loving it

On the Legends jerseys, I’ll start with Bacon’s tweet.  I think he’s probably right that Canham or Bo wouldn’t have been crazy about the concept, but I wonder if they would be ok with unwinding this (at least the jersey portion) after it was already unveiled. 

I need more info on what exactly happening here, but I really like the Legends program including the patch on the jersey.  Whether you like the aesthetics of the patch or not, what this concept did was bring these great players to the forefront and got people (people other than yrs truly) talking about them again.  Dave Brandon had to sell the families of those who had previously retired jersey numbers to bring them back on the field, so now what?  

Legends Program Montage(Bennie McCready & Jake Ryan | Ox Wistert | Mark Harmon)

I know that the athletic department has at least tried to reach out to certain family members of Legends recently I assume to, ahem, talk this through.

I think the biggest problem with the Legends program is that it became a burden on the coaching staff to dole out these jerseys to the “right” player and they felt obligated to include the families as much as possible.  It was probably easier to not bother.  My take, and what I’d sell to the families—just let the coach decide who gets the jersey and leave it at that.  If the designated player and the families form a relationship after that, all the better, but I wouldn’t ask the coaches to work all that out ahead of time.  To Desmond, one of the living Legends (along with Ox Wistert), I’d say the same thing – don’t worry about whether the player “earned” the right to wear #21, just let the coaches assign the number and that’s that.  It should be an honor to Desmond that his name is on any jersey on the sideline.    This bureaucratic burden was why RichRod buried the #1 jersey. 

So, before I blast away any further I’ll chill until I hear more.  My questions — Do the special Legends lockers in the stadium go away?  Does the section of the Towsley museum carved out for the Legends vanish?   Of course the biggest question – do the previously retired jerseys go back in the vault?

No matter what, looks like we’ll have some interesting tweaks to the Uniform Timeline this fall.

 

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Coach Harbaugh recently sent this tweet lauding a few great nicknames in M lore – and as you might guess most of them fall into the Bo era.  With some help from Steve “Dr. Sap” Sapardanis and a few of his contacts, a nickname Rosetta Stone of sorts on that tweet:

SSS

One of the great M Men who was quick to dish out nicknames was of course the great announcer Bob Ufer.  Back in 2012 Sap ran down a healthy list of his nicknames and Ufer-isms that seems apropos:

Below are a few of the more famous nicknames from Bob “THE UFE” Ufer:

* Don Lund (Ufer’s color commentary man) – Lundo
* Jack Lane (Ufer’s stats man) – The Human Computer
* Tom Ufer – Old #3 son
* Bo Schembechler – Bo “George Patton” Schembechler, The General
* Woody Hayes – Dr. Strange Hayes
* Woody Hayes’s Buckeyes – Test Tubes
* Earle Bruce – “Darth Vader” Bruce
* Earle Bruce’s Buckeyes – Scarlet and Gray Stormtroopers
* Dan Devine – Dreary Old Dan Devine
* Michigan State – Jolly Green Giants
* Dennis Franklin – Dennis “The Menace” Franklin
* Ed Shuttlesworth – “Easy” Ed Shuttlesworth
* Mike Lantry – Super Toe
* Gil Chapman – The Jersey Jet
* Gordon Bell – The Whirling Dervish
* Rob Lytle – The Blonde Bullet, The Fremont Flash
* Rick Leach – Ricky “The Peach” Leach, The Flint Phenom, The Guts and Glue of the Maize and Blue
* Russell Davis – Russell “Hustle” Davis
* Harlan Huckleby – Harlan “Huckleberry Finn” Huckleby
* U-M’s 1978 Backfield – Huckleberry Finn deep and Tom Sawyer close
* Thomas Seabron – Old Sea Dog
* Mike Jolly – Butterknife, Bones
* Chris Godfrey – “Manster”  (half Man, half Monster)
* Ron Simpkins – Boo Bear
* Curtis Greer – Curtis “Harvey Martin” Greer
* Roosevelt Smith – Roosevelt “Rosey” Smith
* Bryan Virgil – Bryan “Ozzie” Virgil
* Lawrence Reid – Lawrence “LP” Reid
* John Wangler – Johnny “Winging” Wangler
* Mel Owens – The Hulk
* Mike Trgovac – Tiger Vac
* Anthony Carter – Spider, Darter, Sparkplug, the Human Torpedo and of course just, “AC.”
* Robert Thompson – Robert “Bubba Baker” Thompson
* Butch Woolfolk – “My name is Butch, don’t call me Harold, Woolfolk!”
* Steve Smith – Smitty

Ufer-isms
And because you can’t have one without the other, here are a few common but classic phrases frequently uttered by ol’ Ufe:

* Referees – $100 an hour men
* Michigan Stadium – The Hole that Yost dug, Crisler paid for and Canham carpeted
* Michigan’s Tartan Turf – Canham’s Carpet
* Ohio Stadium – The Snakepit
* Ohio Stadium Crowd – 10,000 Michigan fans and 75,000 Truck Drivers
* The Little Brown Jug – The Finest Piece of Football Crockery in America
* Offensive Co-Ordinator Chuck Stobart’s Offense – Stobart’s Stallions
* Jerry Hanlon’s O-Line – Hanlon’s Hustlers
* Gary Moeller’s Offense – Moeller’s Marauders
* Bill McCartney’s Defense – McCartney’s Monsters
* Michigan Football – “Football is a religion and Saturday is the Holy Day of Obligation”
* The CBs of Michigan Football – “Crisler, Benny, Bump and Bo”
* Ali Haji-Shiekh – “the only Iranian I know who wears cowboy boots”
* Out of the endzone kickoffs – “Aluminum Beer Cans – Non-Returnable”
* “Closer than fuzz on a gnat’s eye “
* “Like a bat out of … you know where bats come from”
* “Pickin’ ‘em up and layin’ ‘em down”
* Two things you can always count on Ufer saying: football is a game of emotions, and games are always won or lost up front in the trenches.

 

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Spotted this on eBay and had to pass it along: it’s what appears to be an official’s ribbon to the epic Michigan-Chicago game of 1898, the game that inspired U-M student Louis Elbel to compose The Victors:

1898 Officials Ribbon Bidding is justifiably up over $400 right now – get some.

While we’re on the topic of the famous 12-11 victory, a resurrected postscript:  Michigan was undoubtedly the Champions of the West in 1898, but looking back do our beloved Wolverines have a claim to the national championship that season?  It’s seems silly discussing this so many decades years later but there is recent precedent for such action.  

In 2004 Southern Cal looked back at its history and claimed the 1939 national championship.   And in August of 2012, our Little Brown Jug-toting buddies Minnesota announced that it claimed a share of the 1904 national championship.   While Harvard and Princeton each take credit for the 1898 crown based on different measurements – Does Michigan, who went undefeated and outscored opponents 205 to 26, have an argument to join them? 

Ok, it’s silly.  But fun to talk about, man.

 

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UGP

Guest post by Steve “Dr. Sap” Sapardanis

AC2 
AC . . . with the NFL Wilson football FWIW

A while back legendary Michigan Football Equipment Manager Jon Falk told me the story of how Anthony Carter was given the #1 jersey to wear by Coach Bo Schembechler.  He also told me that Bo went to unbelievable lengths to get AC to come to A-squared.

Recently I tracked down former U-M Coaches Bill McCartney and Don Nehlen to get the real details of how Carter became a Wolverine.   Nehlen told me that U-M was not regularly into recruiting Florida back then, but at the same time, Michigan was still a considered a program with a national reach.   “I can still remember the first time I saw him at practice,” Nehlen told me.  “I said, ‘Oh, brother—this is a pretty fragile looking guy!’  He was a dynamite football player, though.”  One concern they had about recruiting in Florida was the reality of having to bring the players to Michigan—and more specifically—the Michigan weather.    While he was involved in the courtship, Nehlen also told me that the point man for the recruitment of AC was coach McCartney.

Sure enough, coach Mac had the full skinny and here’s our Q&A:

Steve Sapardanis (SS): Was Carter the most electrifying athlete you had seen in High School?
Coach Bill McCartney (BM): Yes. He really was electric.  He had balance, acceleration.  His quickness was uncommon.  He was a cut above.  One thing you have to remember, the kids in Florida were able to play football year round and as a result, they had a noticeable edge when they got to college.  By the time I went to visit him, he was already leaning toward Miami (Florida).

SS: Did you as coaches feel AC would get you over the hump and help you win a bowl game at Michigan?
BM: You gotta remember, he was the rage!   He was the cat’s meow!  He was shot out of a cannon!  He was faster than a speeding bullet!  It didn’t surprise me one bit that he returned a punt for a touchdown in his first game (at Michigan).

SS: Did you have to recruit his parents to get Anthony to come to Michigan?
BM: In some cases, you are right – you have to recruit the parents, because sometimes if you convinced the kid to come without selling the parents on it, you could lose the kid. That wasn’t the case with Anthony. Michigan was an easy sell.

SS: Why do you think AC wanted to come to Michigan?
BM: Michigan was the maximum experience.  It was a college town. It was a safe town; close to a big city. It had the largest stadium in the country. The most wins in college football history. It was wholesome.

SS: Wasn’t Carter worried about Bo running the ball and not throwing it a lot?
BM: You’re right about Bo wanting to run the ball, but I don’t think Anthony really knew a lot about Michigan, to tell you the truth.

SS: It sounded like AC was the prized recruit in his class – was that the case?
BM: Absolutely.  I’ve never told anyone this before but we saw that the temperature for his visit to Ann Arbor was going to be 10 degrees.  So we had this plan (laughs).  We covered every detail with the coaches and his host.*  It was all rehearsed. I flew down to Florida to pick up Anthony and brought him up to Ann Arbor. Because it was so cold, we were worried that the weather might affect his decision, so when the plane landed in Detroit, we had a car waiting to pick us up. So as soon as we got off the plane, I rushed Anthony into the car (laughs).  And when we got to Ann Arbor, we had the car pull up right in front of the football building and whisked him inside.  I had it coordinated with the other coaches so that Anthony was never outside for more than 10 seconds.   [The host] did a great job with Anthony, showing him around and saying all the right things.   

When his visit was over, I flew back with him to Florida. It was the only time I would ever fly to meet a recruit and fly back home with him – he was that important and that special.  When we landed in Florida, Anthony said to me, “You know coach, it really wasn’t that cold!”  That’s when I knew we got him.

SS: Did the promise of an indoor practice facility factor in his recruitment?

BM: It never did, because we didn’t want to make a big deal about the weather. See, if we talked about that, or how cold it would get, it would have put all the focus on the weather and we didn’t want to talk about that.

Photo Feb 13, 9 07 53 AM

 The ‘79 staff from the game program that season

SS: I heard that while you got AC’s mother to sign his Letter of Intent, getting his father to sign it was a little more involved. Did you and Bo actually go into the Florida Everglades to get Carter’s father to sign his LOI?
BM: Yes, it’s true.

SS: Bo literally rolled up his pant-legs, took off his shoes and socks and walked into the Florida Everglades to get Anthony’s dad to sign his Letter of Intent?
BM: Yes. (laughs!) The old man was foaming at the mouth to get AC!

SS: Why did both of Carter’s parents have to sign his Letter of Intent? Couldn’t it have been faxed?
BM: We weren’t taking any chances.  We didn’t want to run the risk of a fax. Lots of things can happen at the last minute.  Lots of kids will change their mind and vacillate – especially with out-of-state kids.  And with Anthony being from Florida, there were a lot of schools down there wanting to get him to sign.  Anthony was insecure, but was an extra-ordinary kid who came from a not so stable situation.  So Bo and I went down there and timed it (with all the other recruits) so that we were there (on Signing Day). In my mind it was a done deal. That’s why Bo came with me. If Anthony hadn’t signed, I would have been fired! I would have had to find my own way home! In my mind, he was the single greatest recruit Michigan has ever had – ever!  I mean, he was a three-time All-American! When has that ever happened?

 

*Coach Mac couldn’t remember the host player’s name, but John Wangler later told me he thought it was Zeke Wallace from Pompano Beach, FL.

 

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An update to your U-M style guides:  Those of us who love Bob Ufer have often tried to type out how Ufe, imitating Yost, liked to say Michigan.  Until today I settled on “Meechigan”.  I believe John U. Bacon goes with “Meeshegan”.  I’ve seen many other variations here and there.

Well, thumbing through an old 1979 game program I found a piece published by Ufe as part of the 100 year anniversary of the football program and it appears as though Ufe went with “Meeehegan” with 3 (ok, technically 4) Es:

image

So from now on it’s “Meeechegan” for me.

P.S. While poking around on the web I found this story of a dude who randomly met Iggy Pop at a concert…and something cool happened that the author didn’t (and perhaps still doesn’t) understand:

The bar was mercifully empty except for a tiny, longhaired, black leather jacket clad junkie looking guy and his much taller, Tina Louise looking girlfriend.  That man was Iggy Pop.  While the bartender retrieved the beers, I gushed all over my fellow Michigan expat.

“You’re Iggy Pop, man.  I love your stuff.  I’m from Michigan too,” I rambled on, sounding as moronic as the Pop is accused of being by some of his critics.

Iggy pointed to my t-shirt with the word Michigan splayed across my chest.  “Meeschigan,” he said, holding his right arm in front of his slight chest in a 90-degree angle.  “Meeschigan.”

After a minute or so of gushing and trying to open up a conversation with the man who’s music, with the Stooges anyway, was the soundtrack to much of my late adolescence and early adulthood, all I could get out of the guy was “Meeschigan.”  As I turned to go back to the boys, I decided Iggy was either too burned out by the adulation of the years and hero worshiping kids like me or the critics were right.  He was so sort of junkie savant.  Either way, I was utterly confused by our meeting.

Chad and Josh had moved back towards the bar purely for matters of self-defense.  The area in front of the stage had become one large, seething slam dance.  I was grateful I didn’t have to navigate the flannel hipster clad rage to get the guys their beer so I didn’t mention my odd Iggy Pop encounter.

Half an hour later, AMC had gone through a series of ballads that failed to alter the weird, contained rage from the mosh pit.  I felt a tug at my shirt and turned around.  I looked down right at Iggy Pop.

“Meeschigan,” he said, his arm cocked at that 90-degree angle.

“Meeschigan,” I answered him, my arm at the same angle.  He turned and walked out with his Ginger look alike on his arm.

All these years later, our quick meeting still confuses the hell out of me, even more so than his appearance on American Idol.

Sir, your confusion ends here: Iggy Pop grew up a Bob Ufer fan.

 

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