I don’t feature ticket stubs very often on eBay Watch but this one is special.   On its face, this musty, chewed up stub from the 1943 Michigan-Michigan State game doesn’t look very valuable, does it? 

1943 Michigan State

I’m guessing the seller had no idea and is wondering why as of Saturday afternoon it had 17 bids, the tops at $330.   It was a very nice season by Fritz Crisler’s crew, going 8-1, sharing the conference title and finally beating freaking Minnesota whom they hadn’t beaten since 1932.

Readers of this site might recall that this is a very rare find, so rare, in fact is that it was the final stub that local Jack Briegel needed to complete his collection of every game played at the Big House (dating back to ‘27).    Thanks to a gift of this stub in 2011 from fellow collector Ken Magee, Jack got that final piece of the puzzle.

It’s rare for a few reasons as I explained in an earlier post:

The ticket to that September 25 game actually lists Michigan State as the opponent.   But the Spartans did not field a team that season as it was common for teams to shut down their football squads that year due to obligations to the war effort.  Folks seemed to have better things to do that fall day as just over 14,000 bothered to show up, and apparently it wasn’t memorable enough for many fans to bother to hang onto their stubs.

Toast to Yost.   Speaking of stubs, reader Brian pointed out this ticket stub published in the Ann Arbor library archives.   It’s a ticket to the celebration for Fielding Yost in 1940, the event from which I’ve posted a few audio clips recently. 

image

I wonder if Jack or Ken have this one?

The entry associated with the above image states “..the event was held in the compact Waterman Gymnasium. It might have been held at the relatively new Yost Field House which created some controversy among faculty members when Yost named the building after himself.”   

Umm, except the Field House was built by and named after Yost in the 1920s, sooo…

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[Ed. This was originally posted November 3, 2010, but had to deliver this Update]

Update October 7, 2011:  Thanks to the generosity of fellow collector Ken Magee [of Ann Arbor Sports Memorabilia], there is no longer a hole in Jack Briegel’s home ticket collection.   Apparently Magee decided he want Briegel to have it and left the elusive 1943 ‘Michigan State’ ticket stub on his porch last Friday.  What a kind gesture.  I’ll surely do a follow-up on Magee and his collection sometime soon. Here’s the original story for context:

Original Post:
I obviously check out eBay somewhat frequently for the purposes of writing this series but this time I thought I’d introduce you to someone who’s a pro in the memorabilia game.

This month for GoBlueWolverine Mag I submitted a piece on Ann Arbor resident Jack Briegel and his extraordinary collection.   His focus is on ticket stubs and get this, of the 517 games played at Michigan Stadium to date, Briegel has a full ticket or stub from all of them but one.  That’s right – he’s missing 1!

That elusive piece of the puzzle?  A stub to the 1943 game against Western Michigan.  Briegel has a slot waiting for it:

1943 gap

The ticket to that September 25 game actually lists Michigan State as the opponent.   But the Spartans did not field a team that season as it was common for teams to shut down their football squads that year due to obligations to the war effort.  Folks seemed to have better things to do that fall day as just over 14,000 bothered to show up, and apparently it wasn’t memorable enough for many fans to bother to hang onto their stubs.

Certainly a few tickets to that game exist.  According to the records at ticketmuseum.com, a gent named Ken Magee owns that rare ticket and here’s a look:

1943-Michigan State

Briegel’s not the only one taking on this quest.  Collector Dennis Dail of Bloomington, IL is also going for the ticket gusto, missing a mere 8 of the 517 home games:

1945 – Great Lakes
1944 – Indiana, Iowa Pre-Flight
1943 – Mich St., Indiana, Wisconsin
1928 – Ohio Wesleyan
1927 – Ohio Wesleyan

That ’27 Wesleyan game is of course the first ticket to the Big House and very tough to find, in fact, it’s probably Briegel’s favorite of all the stubs adorning his walls.

Of course if you have that elusive ’43 MSU ticket or anyone from Dail’s missing set sitting around let me know.

Coincidentally there’s quite a few rare tickets up on eBay, you can check out those auctions here:

1942 Michigan at Notre Dame

04. September 2011 · Comments Off on Ending Early · Categories: 2011 · Tags: , , , ,

From the official game release:

This is the first Michigan football game to end before all 60 minutes of regulation have been played.

Well kind of.  And I’ll clarify in a minute.

It’s certainly not the first Michigan football game to end before the planned allotted time.   Most notably two of the most famous games in college football history ended early:

  • The 1902 Rose Bowl (the first bowl game ever played) ended with plenty of time on the clock because Yost, Heston and crew were putting a colossal smack down on Stanford.  From the Bentley:

    With eight minutes remaining in the game, Stanford captain Ralph Fisher approached the Wolverine bench and offered to concede; Michigan consented.

  • While this game yielded the Little Brown Jug, the great 1903 Minnesota-Michigan battle between the Western powerhouses also ended early.  The common story is that after the Gophers scored a late TD to tie the game, the Minnesota fans stormed the field and the coaches agreed to call the game. (I’ve heard other claims that approaching weather was a factor in the decision, but haven’t seen much evidence to back that up).  The Sunday November 1, 1903 Minneapolis Tribune says the game ended with “but a few seconds left to play.”  The Detroit Free Press from that Sunday said two minutes remained, headline: 

Freep Nov 1 1903Detroit Free Press  November 1, 1903

As you can imagine they were a little more liberal with the clock in those days, and there were many times when the teams agreed to end the game, mostly due to the Yost beat down that was going on. 

The great John Kryk of Natural Enemies emailed me with some brilliant stuff, explaining this further:

It not only happened often during Point-A-Minute years (and before) as a result of Yost maulings, but in those days the full 70 minutes (two 35-minute halves) were ONLY played when the opponent was of sufficient strength or reputation.

For instance in 1901 Michigan played 10 regular-season games. Only two (Chicago and Iowa) had halves of 35-35. This was by mutual agreement.  Games not only could, but usually were, shortened by mutual agreement.  Sometimes it was even put into the contract a year before.   For instance, the halves were only 20 minutes long in Yost’s first game vs Albion.   Against Pop Warner’s Carlisle team they were 27.5 and 27.5 — obviously a compromise between 25 and 30.

This practice continued at least until the end of the decade. By the early 1910s, with the change to four downs, 100-yard fields and 60-minute, four-quarter games, the practice of pre-determined or ad-hoc shortening was eliminated.

I’m sure there have been other anomalies over the years.  Only one I know of, because of my research focus, is the 1943 Michigan Notre Dame game. The M stadium scoreboard clock malfunctioned, and players and coaches couldn’t believe how long the 3rd quarter was going.   It became evident that it had stopped for a long time. Crisler, Leahy and the officials agreed that they’d probably played (I think it was something like) a 23-minute third quarter, so by mutual agreement they played only a seven-minute fourth quarter.

So in that way, yesterday’s was the shortest 3rd quarter in modern times, and that 43 ND game was the longest.

That is raw historical horsepower, people.  [Get yourself some Natural Enemies if you don’t have it.]

So back to the athletic department line, it’s probably correct that this was the first game since they enacted the standard 60 minute clock to end early.  That said, you certainly can’t dismiss that this happened several times during the Yost era, including in two very famous games.

Related stuff from Saturday’s game:

  • Herron vs. Harmon – Longest Interception Return Ever?
  • Last Weather Delay (Photos from ‘06)
  • Head for The Hills
  • Brady Hoke Arrives…
  • Big House Seat Cushions