This week we head back to 1975 when Lee Corso and the Hoosiers came to town.  Of historical significance in 1975:

  • This game was the last time Michigan Stadium had an announced attendance of fewer than 100,000 (93,857).  So as Craig Barker suggests, should we blame Lee Corso?
  • 1975 was the first season the B1G allowed teams to go to bowl games other than the Rose Bowl.  And Michigan was invited to play the Oklahoma Sooners in the 1976 Orange Bowl.  (And at that Orange Bowl, the Michigan Marching Band unleashed the epic JAWS formation!).

Here’s the clip:

This was a tough year to pick – of historical note on this day in U-M football lore:

You can catch all of the This Week in Michigan Football History clips here…And don’t forget to catch it live Saturday on the KeyBank Countdown to kick-off on WTKA 1050AM starting at 11:30am.

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15. July 2014 · Comments Off on Those Pearly Whites · Categories: 2014 · Tags: , , , , , ,

Yesterday’s press release announcing the home and home Oklahoma in 2025 and 2026 discussed the last meeting between the two teams in the 1976 Orange Bowl, but it failed to note the two most important details of that New Year’s Day battle.

1. First, the presence of the epic All-Whites.  Thanks to the Uniform Timeline we know the whites were used on the road in the 1974 and 1975 seasons, ending with the Orange Bowl against the Sooners:

Michigan All WhitesThe beauty of those outfits is that they possess many of the most loved and/or despised aspects of the uniforms that we just don’t see anymore, but are still discussed (granted, primarily on these pages).  On them you have:

  • The thicker, more sinister looking helmet “wings” on the front of the helmet
  • The stripes converging up on the back of the helmet
  • Helmet decals (snarling wolverine)
  • Of course the white pants with white jerseys
  • The stripes on the sleeves and pants
  • And for posterity, just months later for the 1976 season, Nike shoes were introduced.   See the Uniform Timeline for more.

Bring up the “wrong” opinion on any one of those elements to a uniform snob and you’ll see real, or  at least virtual, shots fired:twitter react 2. Second, the press release didn’t mention the EPIC Michigan Marching Band and their Jaws set.  Holy moly it is a classic (click for the YouTube – 2 parts):

JAWS

 

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Full press release here:

Michigan and Oklahoma to Play Football Series in 2025 and 2026

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Two of college football’s most storied programs will meet for the first time in regular season history when the University of Michigan and the University of Oklahoma play a home-and-home series during the 2025 and 2026 seasons, announced jointly by the two institutions today (July 14). 

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A quick look at the last time, I believe, Michigan donned the all white uniforms:  The 1976 Orange Bowl against eventual national champion Oklahoma:

1976

1976 2

The band got into the white theme during halftime when they rolled out their tribute to a famous Great White Shark—Jaws:

jaws[1]

Here’s the full release from media relations on the road whites:

Michigan Unveils Legacy Road Uniform for MSU Game

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Prior to kickoff of the Battle for the Paul Bunyan Trophy, the University of Michigan football team unveiled a legacy uniform designed by apparel provider adidas.

“Our players really enjoyed the uniforms from the night game with Notre Dame so we decided to surprise them and the country with a new-look design for the Michigan State game,” said head coach Brady Hoke. “This is such a great in-state rivalry that we decided to honor the former players that played in this game.”

The legacy jersey is a compilation of design elements from different eras of Michigan football. It features player numbers on the front and back of the jersey with a block M above the heart and repeating striped sleeves. The shirts under the uniform have “Victors” on the left bicep and “Valiant” on the right bicep.

The white pants are a throwback to the 1974 and 1975 seasons when the program wore all white on the road. In addition, the Wolverines wore two-tone socks with blue on top (calf) and white on the bottom.

Player numbers continued to appear on the famous winged helmet that first appeared in the late 1960s. After wearing them on the helmets for the Notre Dame game, head coach Brady Hoke decided to continue the tradition before the start of the conference season to pay homage to the former players that represented the program in the past.

Michigan warmed up in its traditional road uniforms but returned for the start of the game in the new legacy uniforms.